Lost in non-translation

2016-02-17aWe expected language to be a challenge in Japan. The few phrases we know are difficult to use in real life. Many of the signs in public places have English translations. And we are learning the Japanese characters for some subway stations that we frequently use.

What I didn’t anticipate were the difficulties presented by not being able to read the language. Every day we receive a mailbox full of things. Some are official-looking, with return envelopes for some kind of reply. And totally in Japanese, with not an English word in sight. Same problem with the mysterious messages that pop up on our phones. Trips to the grocery store present yet another exercise in frustration trying to figure out what we are buying.

Plans are to learn to read at least some Japanese language before we leave. In the meantime, we’re relying on my Japanese co-workers to translate the more important-looking mail items. As for the grocery store — well, we may have some unexpected meals for awhile.

Published by

jhawknga

My husband and I were both born and raised in Kansas, but for the past 20+ years we have been living in Atlanta, Georgia. Now, with our children grown and out of the house, we have the opportunity to spend two years living in Tokyo. My husband will be working with the Japanese counterpart to his American company.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s